Best of Last Week: New state of matter, synthesizing a cyclocarbon and calcium connection to age-related memory loss

August 19, 2019 by Bob Yirka
jupiter
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

It was a good week for physics as a team with members from New York University, the University of Buffalo and Wayne State University announced that they had discovered a new state of matter—topological superconductivity.

A team with from several institutions in the U.S. developed a quantum simulation method that allows for showing a quantum system virtually cooled to half of its actual temperature.

And a team at the University of Luxembourg reported on a counterintuitive physics property they found to be widespread in living organisms—negative resistance.

A team at the U.S.'s National Institute of Standards and Technology suggested a newfound superconductor material could be the 'silicon of quantum computers'—noting that properties of the compound uranium ditelluride might be used to allow qubits to exist longer.

A team with members from Oxford University and IBM Research found a way to synthesize a ring-shaped, multi-carbon compound cyclocarbon—using an atomic force microscope.

In space news, a team with members from the University of Tasmania, Monash University, McGill University and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery found a glitch in a neutron star that revealed some of its hidden secrets—for instance, sometimes it spun even faster than a normal glitch.

A team with members from Rice University and Sun Yat-sen University reported on evidence that young Jupiter was smacked head-on by a massive newborn planet—its core appeared to be less dense and more extended than was expected.

In other news, a team at Stanford University announced that they had built a heat shield just 10 atoms thick to protect electronic devices—by sandwiching sheets of three-atom-thick materials.

And a team with members from the Auckland University of Technology, the University of East Anglia and the University of Greenwich carried out a study that revealed the emotional journey of a digital detox while traveling—they found that people go through a multistep withdrawal process when suddenly deprived of their .

And finally, if you are among the millions the world over worried about losing your memory as you grow older, help may be a close as the refrigerator—a team of researchers at the University of Leicester found that calcium is a key to age-related memory loss.

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Citation: Best of Last Week: New state of matter, synthesizing a cyclocarbon and calcium connection to age-related memory loss (2019, August 19) retrieved 12 November 2019 from https://sciencex.com/news/2019-08-week-state-cyclocarbon-calcium-age-related.html
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