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Motoneuron-like cell transplantation and GDNF delivery for repair of SCI

July 21st, 2014
Adipose-derived stem cells-transdifferentiated motoneurons after transplantation can integrate in the host cord. However, cell survival has been restricted by a lack of ideal environment for nerve cell growth.

Taki Tiraihi, Shefa Neuroscience Research Center at Khatam Al-Anbia Hospital, Iran developed rat models of spinal cord injury (SCI) and injected adipose-derived stem cells-transdifferentiated motoneurons into the epicenter, rostral and caudal regions of the impact site and simultaneously transplanted glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-gelfoam complex into the myelin sheath. Motoneurons-like cell transplantation combined with GDNF delivery reduced cavity formations and increased cell density in the transplantation site. The combined therapy exhibited superior promoting effects on recovery of motor function to transplantation of GDNF, adipose-derived stem cells or motoneurons alone. These findings suggest that motoneuron-like cell transplantation combined with GDNF delivery holds a great promise for repair of spinal cord injury.

Related results were published in Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 9, No. 10, 2014).

More information:
Abdanipour A, Tiraihi T, Taheri T. Intraspinal transplantation of motoneuron-like cell combined with delivery of polymer-based glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor for repair of spinal cord contusion injury. Neural Regen Res. 2014;9(10):1003-1013.

Provided by Neural Regeneration Research

Citation: Motoneuron-like cell transplantation and GDNF delivery for repair of SCI (2014, July 21) retrieved 25 October 2020 from https://sciencex.com/wire-news/167392685/motoneuron-like-cell-transplantation-and-gdnf-delivery-for-repai.html
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